6 October 2020

[EN/PL] WGW 2020

Ewa Borysiewicz, Adam Mazur, Tytus Szabelski, Kathryn Zazenski
We Paint What Ghosts And Angels Tell Us To @ Serce Człowieka, photo: Tytus Szabelski
[EN/PL] WGW 2020
We Paint What Ghosts And Angels Tell Us To @ Serce Człowieka, photo: Tytus Szabelski

[EN]

The 10th anniversary, post-lockdown edition of Warsaw Gallery Weekend has come and gone. Despite operating under a new organizational committee, the gallery programming remained stable. It is worth mentioning, that as critics, we were missing some points on the map that were noticeably absent from the program, including Arton, Stroboskop, and Foksal. Events and performances were reduced due to the persisting pandemic but it wasn’t felt as a loss, instead creating space for greater intimacy. Regardless of being held across four days to reduce crowds, the turnout was quite remarkable. This year brought out a surprisingly diverse contingent, with lots of unfamiliar faces queuing to get into galleries even first-thing in the morning, despite Poland reporting its highest number of COVID cases to date. We’re hoping to not feel the same fate of Berlin Gallery Weekend. And even though there was on official afterparty, the atmosphere was kept alive through self-organization. With very few international artists on view or in the crowds (along with curators, collectors, and other art-world staples), the vibe was particularly Polish. This years’ ING main prize went to Polana Institute for the second year in a row, for the exhibition debut of Hannah Krzysztofiak Napoleonka or Death. The controversial choice provided lots of fodder for weekend gossip. The ING special mention went to Serce Człowiek for the double-header We Paint What Ghosts and Angels Tell Us To and Pandemic consequence: Dreams. It’s worth mentioning that this exhibition (along with a showcase organised by W Y), are decent surveys of work being made by young local artists. In general, young female painters dominated the scene, which can be attributed to the work of MSN curator Natalia Sielewicz and Paint, also known as Blood, her exhibition that took place at Warsaw’s Museum of Modern Art last summer. As institutional trust is further eroded by political agendas, greater responsibility is falling to the private and alternative sectors. The recent censoring of Paweł Susid became an opportunity for a game-like intervention, with each gallery subversively including a work hidden somewhere in plain sight. As the editorial team we have compiled a list of our top picks from this years’ edition. 

Małgorzata Mirga-Tas @ Szydlowski Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski
Małgorzata Mirga-Tas @ Szydlowski Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski
Małgorzata Mirga-Tas @ Szydlowski Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski

The Stories We Become, Małgorzata Mirga-Tas @ Szydłowski Gallery

Mirga-Tas primarily uses the clothing of her mother and aunts as the raw materials for her canvases and screens, which are a play between the language of formal painting and craft. The intensely synthetic, vibrantly colored and patterned fabrics are matched with simple, painterly gestures which renders a deeply intimate portrait of her own folk tale of contemporary Roma life. The most remarkable aspect of the exhibition is the care and tenderness in the details, which evokes a strong spirit of family and belonging. The works are intense, dynamic, full of passion and reverence for these weird, awkward and simultaneously beautiful moments of life. (KZ)

Language Of Image/Image Of Language @ ESTA

In addition to the fact that the gallery provided an opportunity to view works by acclaimed artists Andrzej Dłużniewski, Stanisław Dróżdż, Wanda Gołkowska and Jarosław Kozłowski, it was also a good exercise in suspension of disbelief. While experiencing these rare highlights of Polish conceptual art, I was doing my best to ignore the way the exhibition was hung. Apart from the themes announced in the title of the show, the artists allowed us to contemplate the role of art in contemporary discourse concerning the individual and the societal, information and context, language and representation. It is also possible that the display was not an unfortunate coincidence, but rather a conscious method of distraction: a reminder about the here and now, and that art is not only a cosa mentale. (EB)

Wages for Housework @ Foksal Gallery Foundation

At the seat of FGF we take a walk through a darker, repressed side of modernism. The exhibition curated by Paulina Ołowska, seems like a contestation of social expectations towards not only women, but the format of the exhibition itself. The curator bravely challenges the rules of the white cube and changes it into a cozy salon-cum-studio, hosting Ołowska’s femmes fatales, two-sided abstractions by Natalia Załuska and the eerie petit genres of Agata Słowak. (EB)

Wages for Housework @ Foksal Gallery Foundation, photo: Tytus Szabelski
Wages for Housework @ Foksal Gallery Foundation, photo: Tytus Szabelski

Persistence @ Rodriguez Gallery

“Persistence” is the title of the group show at Rodriguez where the work of Michał Smandek struck a particular chord. Centered on the 1981 murder of nine striking coal miners at the ‘Wujek’ mine in southern Poland, the installation (sculpture, photography, and video) confronts us with the humanness of an industry that is now discussed purely from a climatological perspective. These coincidentally nine sculptural objects, copies of all the floral stands found within the engine room, easily become monuments of and to ghosts. (KZ)

Room Tour, Karolina Jabłońska & Sophie Thun @ Raster Gallery

While this is Sophie Thun’s debut, everyone in Poland knows Karolina Jablońska. Thun has just closed her exhibition at Vienna Secession. Lukasz Gorczyca has succeeded in the difficult task of curating painting and photography together, and provoked an impactful dialogue between two powerful female artists. The well-executed installation shows off the skill of both artists as well as their egos. (AM)

Karolina Jabłońska & Sophie Thun @ Raster Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski
Karolina Jabłońska & Sophie Thun @ Raster Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski

Pandemic consequence: Dreams, We Paint What Ghosts And Angels Tell Us To @ Serce Człowieka

The starting point for “Pandemic consequence: Dreams”, the first of two exhibitions organized by Serce Człowieka, was the artists’ existential anxiety concerning their own fate during and post pandemia. Nevertheless, instead of a catastrophic feeling, one could experience an aura of  hope and vitality in both the anarchic arrangement of the exhibition and the multitude of colours and techniques applied by the artists invited to participate. At the core of the second show “We Paint What Ghosts and Angels Tell Us To” by Zuzanna Bartoszek and Krzysztof Grzybacz, were the meetings between artists, ghosts, and angels. The show was put together under the night sky ceiling of the former home of Krytyka Polityczna. I left the exhibition feeling aesthetically satisfied, and with an optimistic conclusion: a commune between worlds is a hard proof that life after the pandemic exists.

We Paint What Ghosts And Angels Tell Us To @ Serce Człowieka, photo: Tytus Szabelski
We Paint What Ghosts And Angels Tell Us To @ Serce Człowieka, photo: Tytus Szabelski
We Paint What Ghosts And Angels Tell Us To @ Serce Człowieka, photo: Tytus Szabelski

HER DARK MATERIALS, Maria Loboda @ Wschod Gallery

Etching one’s name or scrawling an image across a surface, no matter how revered or mundane, is an effort to affirm one’s own presence in the world. Gestures typically likened to careless immaturity and vandalism are immortalized in an amalgamation of their own anonymous plaque, tombstone, mausoleum-like architecture. Hanging high across the gallery wall in two overlapping sections, they force us to crane our necks as we gaze upward in a most reverent gesture. Despite being one of several sculptural works on view in the solo exhibition HER DARK MATERIALS, this piece becomes the standout in its brilliant collapsing of contemporary structure with timeless, universal, human impulse. (KZ)

Welcome to Itchy Truths, Cezary Poniatowski @ Stereo Gallery

The exhibition of Cezary Poniatowski at Stereo gallery’s new venue shows a variety of colours, techniques and materials which the artist has applied over the past few years. As visitors of this curious wunderkammer we can follow a process of a gradual spatialization of the works (from painting through relief to wooden dioramas) and observe their shapes’ oscillation between the “familiar” and the “uncanny”. The silhouettes of some works seem almost figurative and suggest a story happening between the subsequent pieces. At the same time, they are unusual enough not to reveal the tale’s ending. (EB)

On the Emptiness of Fame and the Fleeting Taste of Wild Strawberries, Wojciech Ireneusz Sobczyk @ LETO Gallery

The monographic show of Wojciech Ireneusz Sobczyk, can be interpreted as a statement on repressed corporeality and inevitable punishment for forbidden desires. Sobczyk refers to the Baroque era not only in the field of iconography or stylistics, but synthesizing all elements in a total work of art (a then popular convention), covering the whole space of the gallery. The artist has produced an impressive work in many respects, however, when one recalls the influence of the Catholic Church in the 17th century, it turns out that we should perhaps read Sobczyk’s piece not as an update of the old topoi, but rather as a warning. (EB)

 

Wojciech Ireneusz Sobczyk @ LETO Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski
Wojciech Ireneusz Sobczyk @ LETO Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski
Wojciech Ireneusz Sobczyk @ LETO Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski

Tatjana Danneberg @ Dawid Radziszewski Gallery 

These large format works catch the attention of the viewer in their scale and technical realization. Banal snapshots are full of references to pop art (the vacuum cleaner) and Expressionism (the burning chair). It’s a great debut of the Warsaw-based, Austrian-born artist, it’s definitely a braver proposition than that, what can be seen in the works of female painters present at this year’s WGW. (AM)

Abzgram, Karolina Wojtas @ Instytut Fotografii Fort 

Known on Instagram as ‘Matriioszka’, Karolina Wojtas is dealing with the experience of primary school. At first, the encounter with the show is overwhelming, but it turns out this is a good move for the photographic works. These photos tell the story of childhood through the decades, using the artist’s brother as the primary subject of the works. Although the school nightmare never ends, the show is really great. (AM)

Jurassic Garden, Joanna Malinowska & C. T. Jasper @ Le Guern Gallery

The presentation of Malinowska and Jasper is a feast for the fans of this creative duo, but also for those who have never heard of the pair. On the one hand, this show is intelligent, encapsulating many cultural references, on the other hand it’s a reductive form of expression and is an escape to primordial aesthetics and anachronic techniques. The show is multilayered, consistent, well done and authentic.

Interpenetration of Time, Roma Hałat @ HOS Gallery 

This is the second posthumous exhibition of a prolific, still widely unrecognized Polish female artist that I’ve seen in the past six months (Urszula Broll at Królikarnia is the other). Hałat, who died in 2012, created deeply complex drawings and paintings, experimenting with systems of rhythm and pattern and time. Echoing cultural signifiers both profound and trite, these works are beautiful in their obsessiveness and observational translations (i.e. a tracing the shadow of her hand across the page). The absence of these (and countless others) women from the art historical canon is continually infuriating and felt, even if subconsciously. (KZ)

 

We Paint What Ghosts And Angels Tell Us To @ Serce Człowieka, photo: Tytus Szabelski

[PL]

WGW2020

O specyfice tegorocznej, dziesiątej edycji Warsaw Gallery Weekend, zadecydowała pandemia. Pomimo szczytu zachorowań impreza się nie tylko odbyła, ale też przy podobnej liczbie wystawiających galerii, przyciągnęła większe tłumy, niż edycja z 2019 roku. Choć krytykom doskwiera brak obecnych niegdyś na mapie WGW miejsc jak Fundacja Arton, Stroboskop, czy Galeria Foksal, to przyjęty przed dwoma laty model organizacyjny działa sprawnie. Wygłodniała post-covidowa publika rzuciła się na sztukę z przyjemnością wystając w kolejkach, spotykając i plotkując z dawno niewidzianymi znajomymi z artworldu. Nawet jeśli nie było oficjalnego afterparty i tłocznych imprez, to ludzie i tak spotykali się na kawę, drinki i kolacje. Można mieć tylko nadzieję, że nie skończy się na wysypie wirusa wśród uczestników, jak miało to miejsce po weekendzie sztuki w Berlinie. Tak czy inaczej, sztuka, publiczność, a nawet pogoda dopisały i było to świetne otwarcie sezonu. Trzeba podkreślić też słabe strony WGW2020. Większość artystów to artyści polscy, podobnie jak kolekcjonerzy i krytycy. Chwilowo z międzynarodowymi aspiracjami organizatorów, wygrał wirus. Również program wydarzeń publicznych został ścięty. Podobnie z programem performance. Zaletą takiej sytuacji jest impreza łatwiejsza do zobaczenia i przyswojenia. Tegoroczna edycja odbywała się pod fantomowym patronatem Natalii Sielewicz, kuratorki warszawskiego MSN, a w szczególności wystawy “Farba znaczy krew”. Młode malarki z wystawy Sielewicz zdominowały tegoroczne WGW. Wygląda na to, że Sielewicz przejdzie do historii sztuki wprowadzeniem całego pokolenia młodych malarek na rynek sztuki. Jedną z najbardziej kontrowersyjnych decyzji było przyznanie nagrody ING po raz drugi z rzędu wystawie prezentowanej w Polana Institute. Nie chodzi o to, czy malarstwo debiutującej Hanny Krzysztofiak podoba się, czy nie, co o wrażenie powtórki z podobnie grającego kiczem malarstwa Mikołaja Sobczaka nagrodzonego w zeszłym roku. Czy to rzeczywiście najciekawsze zjawisko artystyczne w tej szerokości geograficznej? Do trzech razy sztuka… Kamil Pierwszy też się może cieszyć, bo jego zbiorowa wystawa w Sercu Człowieka, również wyróżniona przez ING, jest rodzajem prezentacji szalonej, absurdalnej i bałaganiarskiej. Wystawa wygląda jak żart, ale nieźle odpowiada nowej sztuce. Szkoda, że jury nie zdecydowało się na bardziej odważny ruch i przyznania głównej nagrody właśnie tej prezentacji i samej inicjatywie, jaką jest Serce Człowieka. Taki przegląd to szansa na zobaczenie w masie, za to bez presji polityki tego, co młodzi artyści mają do powiedzenia. Należy odnotować także fakt zaangażowania po raz pierwszy WGW w politykę kulturalną. Galerie wsparły ocenzurowanego w instytucji publicznej Pawła Susida, którego prace były prezentowane w wybranych z galerii biorących udział w WGW. Rodzaj meta-wystawy był wyrazem solidarności z artystą. Poniżej relacja z tego, co było najważniejsze, najbardziej inspirujące i zostanie z nami na dłużej. Poniżej wybór autorów i redakcji BLOKU.

Małgorzata Mirga-Tas @ Szydlowski Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski
Małgorzata Mirga-Tas @ Szydlowski Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski

Historie, którymi się stajemy, Małgorzata Mirga-Tas @ Szydłowski Gallery

Materiałem pełniącym zasadniczo rolę płócien i podobrazi są dla Mirgi-Tas ubrania matki i ciotek. Zabieg ten sprawia wrażenie gry toczącej się z użyciem formalnego języka malarstwa i rzemiosła. Intensywnie syntetyczne, barwne i wzorzyste materiały, łączą się z prostymi malarskimi gestami, tworząc głęboko intymny portret, przypominający ludowe opowieści o życiu współczesnych Romów. Najbardziej znaczącymi aspektami wystawy są troska i czułość, najlepiej widoczne w szczegółach przywodzących na myśl wynikającą z więzi rodzinnych i poczucia przynależności, duchową siłę. Prace są gęste, dynamiczne, pełne pasji i oddania tym wszystkim dziwnym, niezbyt przyjemnym a zarazem pięknym aspektom codziennego życia. (KZ)

Język obrazu/Obraz języka @ ESTA

Wystawa, poza możliwością zapoznania się z nieoczywistymi pracami Andrzeja Dłużniewskiego, Stanisława Dróżdża, Wandy Gołkowskiej i Jarosława Kozłowskiego, była też dla mnie dobrym ćwiczeniem z “suspension of disbelief” – w trakcie podziwiania bardzo ciekawych (i mam wrażenie – rzadko prezentowanych!) przykładów polskiego konceptualizmu, próbowałam ignorować aranżację utrudniającą odbiór prac. Oprócz problematyki obiecanej w tytule, pokaz galerii ESTA można odnieść do współczesnych nam rozważań o relacjach między jednostką a społeczeństwem, informacją a kontekstem, czy językiem a reprezentacją. Niewykluczone, że zakłócająca kontemplację aranżacja była zabiegiem celowym i miała przypomnieć mi o rzeczywistości “tu i teraz”, oraz, że sztuka to nie tylko “una cosa mentale”. (EB)

Wages for Housework @ Foksal Gallery Foundation, photo: Tytus Szabelski
Wages for Housework @ Foksal Gallery Foundation, photo: Tytus Szabelski

Płaca za Pracę Domową @ Foksal Gallery Foundation

W siedzibie FGF przechodzimy na drugą, mroczną stronę modernizmu. Wystawa “Płaca za Pracę Domową”, kuratorowana przez Paulinę Ołowską, wydaje się kontestować i podważać nie tylko społeczne oczekiwania wobec kobiet, ale i samego medium wystawy. Kuratorka śmiało neguje reguły klasycznego, galeryjnego “white cube” na rzecz przypominającej domowy salonik (lub studio) aranżacji, którą oprócz portretów “kobiet wyklętych” Ołowskiej, nieoczywistych, dwustronnych abstrakcji Załuskiej, zamieszkują postaci z niepokojących, malarskich i lalkarskich para-rodzajowych scen Słowak. (EB)

Persistence @ Rodriguez Gallery

“Trwałość”, czy “uporczywość”, jak przetłumaczyć można tytuł zbiorowej wystawy pokazywanej w Galerii Rodriguez, dobrze współbrzmi z pracami Michała Smandka. Instalacja, której tematem jest pamięć o dziewięciu górnikach zabitych w 1981 roku w kopalni “Wujek” składa się z obiektów, fotografii i wideo, humanizujących na swój sposób przemysł, któremu dziś przyglądamy się niemal wyłącznie z perspektywy klimatologicznej. Przypadkowe obiekty rzeźbiarskie, będące kopiami dziewięciu stojaków na doniczki znalezionych przez artystę w jednym z pomieszczeń kopalni, łatwo potraktować jako pomniki duchów i duchom dedykowane. (KZ)

Karolina Jabłońska & Sophie Thun @ Raster Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski
Karolina Jabłońska & Sophie Thun @ Raster Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski

Room Tour, Karolina Jabłońska & Sophie Thun @ Raster Gallery

Jabłońską w Polsce znają już wszyscy, natomiast Thun to debiut na lokalnej scenie. Sophie jest zaraz po świetnej wystawie w wiedeńskiej Secesji. Łukaszowi Gorczycy udała się trudna sztuka łączenia fotografii z malarstwem oraz sprowokowanie autentycznego dialogu między artystkami. Świetnie powieszone prace zagarnęły przestrzeń Rastra problematyzując warsztat, przedstawiając sylwetki, a nade wszystko eksponując artystyczne ego Jabłońskiej i Thun. (AM)

Skutki pandemii: sny, We Paint What Ghosts And Angels Tell Us To @ Serce Człowieka

Punktem wyjścia dla pierwszej z dwóch organizowanych przez galerię Serce Człowieka wystaw, grupowej “Skutki pandemii: sny”, była odczuwana przez artystów niepewność o własny los w trakcie i ewentualnym “po” pandemii. Mimo tego na wystawie, zamiast katastrofy, dało się wyczuć było przede wszystkim nadzieję i witalność obserwowalną zarówno w burzliwej aranżacji ekspozycji, jak i wielości mediów i barw. W centrum drugiego z pokazów, “We paint what ghosts and angels tell us to” Zuzanny Bartoszek i Krzysztofa Grzybacza, zaaranżowanym pod gwiaździstym, niebieskim sufitem dawnej siedziby Krytyki Politycznej, znajdują się spotkania artystów z duchami i aniołami. Z wystawy wyszłam estetycznie usatysfakcjonowana i z optymistycznym wnioskiem: istoty spomiędzy światów są dowodem na to, że “życie po COVIDzie” istnieje. (EB)

We Paint What Ghosts And Angels Tell Us To @ Serce Człowieka, photo: Tytus Szabelski
We Paint What Ghosts And Angels Tell Us To @ Serce Człowieka, photo: Tytus Szabelski
We Paint What Ghosts And Angels Tell Us To @ Serce Człowieka, photo: Tytus Szabelski

HER DARK MATERIALS, Maria Loboda @ Wschód Gallery

Wyrycie własnego imienia lub bazgranie po obrazie (lub po innej powierzchni – nieważne, jak bardzo cennej lub trywialnej), jest wysiłkiem mającym na celu potwierdzenie własnej obecności w świecie. Taki gest, zwykle kojarzony z beztroską i niedojrzałością, a nawet zwykłym wandalizmem, może przetrwać wieki: jako inskrypcja wyryta na nagrobku, napis na ścianie mauzoleum, ale też anonimowa, lecz dziwnym trafem zachowana przez wieczność płyta. Wiszące wysoko na ścianie galerii zachodzące na siebie części fryzu, zmuszają nas do zadarcia głowy i podniesienia wzroku niczym w pełnej podziwu pozie. Ten jeden obiekt wybrany spośród szeregu prac rzeźbiarskich składających się na wystawę indywidualną Lobody, wyróżnia się jako mocne połączenie dziecięcych ciągot i uniwersalnej zarazem bezczasowości w ramach jednej gładkiej i współczesnej płaszczyzny. (KZ)

Welcome to Itchy Truths, Cezary Poniatowski @ Stereo Gallery

Wystawa Cezarego Poniatowskiego w nowej siedzibie galerii Stereo ukazuje mnogość technik i materiałów, z których na przestrzeni lat korzystał artysta. Jako widzowie tej dziwnej wunderkammer, możemy śledzić proces stopniowego uprzestrzenniania się prac (od malarstwa przez relief do drewnianych dioram) oraz oscylacji ich form między “znajomym” a “niepokojącym” (heimlich / unheimlich): kształty niektórych prac, wydają się wystarczająco bliskie i figuratywne, aby zasugerować nam jakąś historię dziejącą pomiędzy nimi, a jednocześnie na tyle obce, aby nie zdradzić nam jej zakończenia. (EB)

O próżnej sławie i ulotnym smaku truskawki lub poziomki, Wojciech Ireneusz Sobczyk @ LETO Gallery

Prace Wojciecha Ireneusza Sobczyka można interpretować jako skomplikowaną opowieść o wypartej cielesności i nieuniknionej karze za pożądanie. Sobczyk nawiązuje nie tylko do barokowej ikonografii, czy wirtuozerskich, iluzjonistycznych popisów ówczesnych mistrzów, ale i do popularnej wtedy konwencji dzieła totalnego, syntezy sztuk. Artysta zrealizował pracę pod wieloma względami (a w szczególności technicznym) imponującą, jednak gdy przypomnimy sobie o potędze XVII-wiecznego kościoła – instytucji, okaże się, że być może powinniśmy traktować wypowiedź artysty nie jako aktualizację dawnych topoi, ale jako ostrzeżenie. (EB)

Wojciech Ireneusz Sobczyk @ LETO Gallery photo: Tytus Szabelski
Wojciech Ireneusz Sobczyk @ LETO Gallery, photo: Tytus Szabelski
Wojciech Ireneusz Sobczyk @ LETO Gallery , photo: Tytus Szabelski

Tatjana Danneberg @ Dawid Radziszewski Gallery 

Olbrzymie jak na WGW formaty prac zwracają, uwagę oryginalną techniką łączącą malarski gest z fotograficzną reprezentacją rzeczywistości. Przeskalowane, banalne snapshoty zaskakują odniesieniami do pop-artu (odkurzacz), ale też dzikiego malarstwa (płonące krzesło). Znakomity debiut mieszkającej w Warszawie Austriaczki. To dużo odważniejsza i poważniejsza propozycja od ton młodego quasi-politycznego, surrealizującego malarstwa kobiet prezentowanego w tym roku na WGW. (AM) 

Abzgram, Karolina Wojtas @ Instytut Fotografii Fort 

Znana na Instagramie jako Matriioszka Karolina Wojtas pokazuje wystawę dosłownie i w przenośni szkolną. Przytłaczająca na pierwszy rzut oka scenografia okazuje się niezłą ramą dla inscenizowanych zdjęć opowiadających o dzieciństwie i szkolnej opresji jakiej poddany jest brat artystki, ale też wszystkie dzieci polskie, od pokoleń, aż po dziś dzień. Koszmar szkolny, za to wystawa piękna. (AM)

Ogród Jurajski, Joanna Malinowska & C. T. Jasper @ Le Guern Gallery
Prezentacja Joanny Malinowskiej i CT Jaspera w Le Guern to uczta dla fanów tego twórczego duetu, jak i dla tych, którzy o nim nie słyszeli. To wystawa z jednej strony erudycyjna, zawierająca mnóstwo odniesień do tekstów kultury, z drugiej redukująca formę wyrazu i uciekająca się do „pierwotnych” estetyk, “anachronicznych” technik takich jak drzeworyt,oraz lokalnych kontekstów. Wystawa wielowątkowa ale spójna, dopracowana i bardzo autentyczna.

Przenikanie czasu, Roma Hałat @ HOS Gallery 

To już druga pośmiertna wystawa znakomitej i wciąż zapoznanej polskiej artystki, którą oglądałam w ciągu ostatniego półrocza (druga to Urszula Broll w Królikarni). Zmarła w 2012 roku Hałat rysowała i malowała eksperymentując z systemami rytmicznymi, wzorami i czasem. Przywołując echo kulturowych kontekstów, ważnych i banalnych zarazem, prace Hałat są piękne w swojej obsesyjności i  uważnych translacjach (np. śledzenia ruchu cienia dłoni artystki na papierze). Nieobecność tych kobiet (i niezliczonych innych) w kanonie historii sztuki jest nieustająco wkurzająca i wyraźnie odczuwalna, nawet nieświadomie. (KZ)

 

Imprint

See also