25 September 2020

[EN/DE] ‘Evelyne Axell: Body Double’ at Muzeum Susch

‘Evelyne Axell: Body Double’, exhibition at Muzeum Susch, 2020, installation view. Foreground: special contribution by Sylvie Fleury, Marcel et Robert, 2009. Photograph: Maja Wirkus. Courtesy Muzeum Susch / Art Stations Foundation CH
[EN/DE] ‘Evelyne Axell: Body Double’ at Muzeum Susch
‘Evelyne Axell: Body Double’, exhibition at Muzeum Susch, 2020, installation view. Foreground: special contribution by Sylvie Fleury, Marcel et Robert, 2009. Photograph: Maja Wirkus. Courtesy Muzeum Susch / Art Stations Foundation CH

[EN]

Muzeum Susch presents Body Double, a retrospective exhibition of the Belgian Pop-Surrealist Evelyne Axell (1935-1972). With her original feminist approach in the 1960s Axell became one of the pioneers of Pop Art in Europe. Her distinct body of work is populated by an all-female universe, transcending the established iconography of Pop Art at the time and reclaiming the discourse of women’s sexuality.

Evelyne Axell’s career was tragically cut short by her untimely death in a car accident, at the early age of 37. Subsequently, her contribution to early feminist art and Pop Art was left out of the dominant narrative of art history, alongside her fellow contemporaries such as Pauline Boty, Rosalind Drexler, Kiki Kogelnik, and Dorothy Iannone, who have received a long overdue recognition only in recent years.

Co-curated by Anke Kempkes, international curator, art historian and art critic and Krzysztof Kościuczuk, artistic director of Muzeum Susch, this exhibition will present an overall of sixty exhibits spanning the broad spectrum of the artist’s entire oeuvre. Body Double brings together a large selection of collages, drawings, relief paintings, sculptures, filmic and photographic works – many of which have not been on view in decades. Axell experimented with novel artificial materials, such as her signature technique of car enamel paint on plastic. This exhibition is the largest museum retrospective of Axell’s work staged outside of her native Belgium, after an exhibition organized at Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach in 2011.

 As a special contribution, the exhibition features the prominent installation Marcel et Robert (2009) by Swiss artist Sylvie Fleury, entering into a cross-generational iconographic dialogue with Axell’s work. The rotating disk forming the base of Fleury’s work is designed as a giant Pop-coloured target mirroring the concentric composition in Axell’s painting The Wall of Sound (1966).

Born in Belgium in 1935, Evelyne Axell began her career as a charismatic theatre and film actress. She also authored the script for the 1963 movie Le Crocodile en Peluche, which portrays the prejudice faced by a multi-ethnic couple in Brussels as the Belgian colonial rule was coming to an end in the Congo.

Taught for one year by the Belgian Surrealist René Magritte, Axell abandoned acting and turned to painting in 1964. She processed the contemporary vocabulary of Pop Art through a feminist reading of Surrealism expanding the radical legacy of her female Surrealist forerunners. Axell’s daring work was met with derision by the male-dominated scene of art critics at the time, which prompted the artist to sign her works solely with her last name ‘Axell’ to elude any gendered associations, a move shared by many female artists and writers in the first half of the 20th century.

Evelyne Axell in her garden with her work 'La Grande Sortie dans L’espace', 1968. Courtesy Archives of Philippe Axell

 

Body Double highlights various political themes in Axell’s work, situating her iconography in the international movements of the 1960s and early 70s. As an active witness of the era of sexual liberation, Axell focused on a female body freed from past conventions of depicting femininity. Throughout her work, Axell forged a signature iconography of empowered female nudes inhabiting the sphere of utopian homosociality. In her only public interview in 1969, Axell stated, ‘…The most extraordinary beings I ever met were almost all women, I find women most exquisite. They are everything at once: voluptuousness, luxury, frivolity, tenderness, courage, greed and total selflessness. That is to say the synthesis of the weaknesses and strengths of mankind’.

The exhibition Body Double highlights the recurring motif of ‘the double’ in Axell’s compositions. Frequently based on the artist’s own image, identical female nudes appear as kindred gatekeepers gracing portals to a territory of unbeknown promises. Fragmented portraits impart the condition of the female ‘split self’. There are also female ‘homoerotic twins’ – typically absorbed in an embrace, a kiss, or in explicit love-making. Mirrored multi-ethnic female nudes – as in Axell’s cinematic experiment Noire et Blanche (1966/7) – constitute yet another aspect of the ‘double’, resonating with the nascent post-colonial emancipation and the ‘Black is Beautiful’ cultural pride manifestations during the Civil Rights movement at the time which Axell supported.

In the wake of the May ‘68 events Axell was – alongside fellow artist Marcel Broodthaers – in the frontline of counter-cultural activities in the Belgian art scene. In 1970 she joined the local campaign against the imprisonment of the U.S. feminist activist and Marxist thinker Angela Davis, one of Axell’s female idols to whom she dedicated two portraits.

Another aspect of ‘the double’ in Axell’s work appears in her vision of the ‘bio-botanique’ (Axell, 1970): exotic animals become alter egos, tropical vegetation consumes the body, and surreal beastly hybrids inhabit an alternative sphere of ‘bio-cultural companionship’. In the devouring embrace of the Le Homard Amoureux (Lobster in Love, 1967) the shape of the female nude merges into a human-crustacean union. Axell explores this new universe ruled by the dynamics of metamorphosis in her early 1970s ‘Paradise’ series where the female figure is dissolving in the composition – ‘Gradually she loses her voice. Then memory. And, finally, the reason’ (Axell, Poem, 1972). She erotically unites with plants and animals and is transformed into a botanical entity.

The rich iconography of the Body Double culminates in one of Axell’s most prominent works La Grande Sortie dans l’Espace (The Great Journey into Outer Space, 1967), a futuristic vision of a pagan dance where identical cosmonautic nudes float in an abstract space: a zone ruled by female sensuality. It is the artist’s Arcadian vision of a joyful, anti-authoritarian future dimension.

Evelyne Axell’s work remains highly evocative today in its transgressive iconography, feminist agenda and utopian outlook.

Evelyne Axell, 'Et Fondre de Plaisir!’, 1964, mixed media and collage on paper, 36.4 × 55.3 cm. Courtesy Collection Philippe Axell, Photo Paul Louis. Copyright: ADAGP, Paris - Prolitteris, Zurich 2020
Evelyne Axell, 'Tiger Woman (Autoportrait)’, 1964, mixed media and collage on paper, 54.9 × 72.9 cm. Courtesy Collection Philippe Axell, Photo Paul Louis. Copyright: ADAGP, Paris - Prolitteris, Zurich 2020
‘Evelyne Axell: Body Double’, exhibition at Muzeum Susch, 2020, installation view. Photograph: Maja Wirkus. Courtesy Muzeum Susch / Art Stations Foundation CH
Evelyne Axell, ‘La Grande Sortie Dans L’espace’, 1967, canvas inserted in Clartex, spray paint, 123 × 303 cm. Courtesy Collection Philippe Axell, Photo Paul Louis. Copyright: ADAGP, Paris - Prolitteris, Zurich 2020
'Evelyne Axell: Body Double’, exhibition at Muzeum Susch, 2020, installation view. Photograph: Maja Wirkus. Courtesy Muzeum Susch / Art Stations Foundation CH
Evelyne Axell, ‘La Femme Homard’, 1967, spray paint, clartex and canvas, 98 × 60 cm. Courtesy Collection Philippe Axell, Photo Paul Louis. Copyright: ADAGP, Paris - Prolitteris, Zurich 2020
1. Evelyne Axell, ‘Les Championnes’, 1966, diptych, oil on canvas, spray paint on cut-out canvas, two panels, 160 × 60 cm each. Courtesy Collection Philippe Axell, Photo Paul Louis. Copyright: ADAGP, Paris - Prolitteris, Zurich 2020
Evelyne Axell, 'Le Geste / Transparance’, 1967, enamel, clartex and canvas, 49 × 43 cm. Courtesy Collection Philippe Axell, Photo Paul Louis. Copyright: ADAGP, Paris - Prolitteris, Zurich 2020
‘Evelyne Axell: Body Double’, exhibition at Muzeum Susch, 2020, installation view. Photograph: Maja Wirkus. Courtesy Muzeum Susch / Art Stations Foundation CH
‘Evelyne Axell: Body Double’, exhibition at Muzeum Susch, 2020, installation view. Photograph: Maja Wirkus. Courtesy Muzeum Susch / Art Stations Foundation CH
‘Evelyne Axell: Body Double’, exhibition at Muzeum Susch, 2020, installation view. Photograph: Maja Wirkus. Courtesy Muzeum Susch / Art Stations Foundation CH
Evelyne Axell, ‘La Fille de Feu’, 1967-1968, enamel on wood and Clartex, 120 × 110 cm. Courtesy Collection Philippe Axell, Photo Paul Louis. Copyright: ADAGP, Paris - Prolitteris, Zurich 2020
‘Evelyne Axell: Body Double’, exhibition at Muzeum Susch, 2020, installation view. Photograph: Maja Wirkus. Courtesy Muzeum Susch / Art Stations Foundation CH
Evelyne Axell, ‘Portrait Fragmenté’, 1965, oil on canvas, 42 x 33 cm. Private collection, Belgium, courtesy Bounameaux Art Expertise, Bruxelles. Copyright: ADAGP, Paris - Prolitteris, Zurich 2020
Evelyne Axell in front of her work ‘Le Mur du Son’, 1966. Courtesy Archives of Philippe Axell.
‘Evelyne Axell: Body Double’, exhibition at Muzeum Susch, 2020, installation view. Foreground: special contribution by Sylvie Fleury, Marcel et Robert, 2009. Photograph: Maja Wirkus. Courtesy Muzeum Susch / Art Stations Foundation CH

[DE]

Muzeum Susch präsentiert mit Body Double eine Retrospektive der belgischen Pop-Surrealistin Evelyne Axell (1935–1972). Mit ihrem originellen feministischen Ansatz wurde Axell in den 1960er Jahren eine der Pionierinnen der Pop Art in Europa. Ihr unverkennbares Werk ist bestimmt durch ein rein weibliches Universum, das die damals etablierte Ikonographie der Pop Art überschritt und den Diskurs der weiblichen Sexualität in eine spezifisch feminine Perspektive rückte.

Evelyne Axells Karriere brach tragischerweise durch ihren vorzeitigen Tod bei einem Autounfall im Alter von nur 37 Jahren ab, und ihr Werk und dessen Beitrag zur feministischen Kunst und zur Pop Art wurde in der Folge aus dem Kanon der Kunstgeschichte ausgeschlossen. Ein Schicksal, das sie mit Zeitgenossinnen wie Pauline Boty, Rosalind Drexler, Kiki Kogelnik und Dorothy Iannone teilt, die erst in den letzten Jahren gebührende Anerkennung gefunden haben.

Die von Anke Kempkes (internationale Kuratorin, Kunsthistorikerin und Kunstkritikerin) und Krzysztof Kościuczuk (Künstlerischer Leiter des Muzeum Susch) gemeinsam kuratierte Ausstellung präsentiert um die sechzig Werke, die das gesamte Oeuvre der Künstlerin umspannen. Body Double versammelt eine Auswahl von Collagen, Zeichnungen, Relief-Bildern, Skulpturen, und filmische und photographische Arbeiten, von denen einige seit Jahrzehnten nicht mehr öffentlich gezeigt wurden. Axell experimentierte mit neuartigen Kunststoffen, und entwickelte originelle Techniken wie die Verwendung von Autolack zum Bemalen von Plastik. Nach einer Präsentation im Museum Abteiberg, Mönchengladbach, im Jahr 2011, wird dies die größte museale Einzelretrospektive außerhalb von Axells Heimat Belgien.

Ein prominenter Beitrag zu der Ausstellung ist die Installation Marcel et Robert (2009) der Schweizer Künstlerin Sylvie Fleury, die in einen generationsübergreifenden ikonographischen Dialog mit Axells Arbeit eintritt. Die großformatige rotierende Scheibe, die die skulpturale Plattform von Fleurys Kunstwerk bildet, ist als Pop-kolorierte Zielscheibe entworfen und korrespondiert mit der konzentrischen Komposition in Axells Gemälde Le Mur du Son (Die Klangmauer, 1966).

Im Jahr 1935 in Belgien geboren, begann Evelyne Axell ihre Karriere als charismatische Theater- und Filmschauspielerin. Zudem schrieb sie das Drehbuch für den 1963 erschienenen Spielfilm Le Crocodile en Peluche (Das Plüschkrokodil). Vor dem Hintergrund der ausgehenden belgischen Kolonialherrschaft im Kongo thematisiert der Film die Vorurteile, denen ein multiethnisches Paar in Brüssel ausgesetzt ist.

Nachdem sie ein Jahr bei dem belgischen Surrealisten René Magritte studiert hatte, gab Axell 1964 die Schauspielerei auf, um sich der Malerei zuzuwenden. Sie verarbeitete das Vokabular der Pop Art durch eine feministisch motivierte Lesart des Surrealismus und erweiterte damit das damals größtenteils unsichtbare Vermächtnis ihrer surrealistischen Vorläuferinnen. Axells gewagte Praxis wurde seitens einer damals vorrangig männlichen Szene von Kunstkritikern zunächst mit Ablehnung begegnet. Dies bewegte die Künstlerin dazu, ihre Werksignatur auf lediglich ihren Nachnamen „Axell“ zu reduzieren, um so jeglicher Geschlechtszuweisung zu entgehen; eine Haltung, die sie mit vielen Künstlerinnen und Schriftstellerinnen besonders der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jhd. teilte.

Evelyne Axell in her studio in Brussels, 1972. Courtesy Archives of Philippe Axell

Body Double hebt verschiedene politische Themen in Axells Werk hervor und situiert ihre Ikonographie in den gesellschaftskritischen Kontext der internationalen Bewegungen der 1960er und frühen 1970er Jahre. Als aktive Zeitzeugin der Ära der sexuellen Befreiung befasst sich Axell in ihrer künstlerischen Auseinandersetzung mit einem weiblichen Körperbild, entfesselt von etablierten Konventionen in der Darstellung und Verhandlung des Femininen.

Axells Werk ist durchgängig von einer einzigartigen Ikonographie geprägt: Innerhalb einer utopischen Sphäre der Homosozialität verleiht sie ihren weiblichen Figuren einen befreienden Handlungsspielraum. In ihrem einzigen veröffentlichten Interview von 1969 verkündet Axell: „… die außergewöhnlichsten Geschöpfe, die ich jemals getroffen habe, sind nahezu alle Frauen, ich finde Frauen ausgesprochen exquisit. Sie sind alles zugleich; Sinnlichkeit, Luxus, Frivolität, Zärtlichkeit, Courage, Gier und absolute Selbstlosigkeit. Sprich — eine Synthese aus den Schwächen und Stärken des Menschen.”

Die Ausstellung Body Double thematisiert das wiederkehrende Motiv der „Dopplung“ in Axells Kompositionen. Oft inspiriert vom eigenen Antlitz der Künstlerin, werden identische, weibliche Akte dargestellt, vertieft in einen Dialog, emblematisch eingefangen gleich einem griechischen Fries, oder aufgestellt wie die Hüterinnen eines Portals, das in ein Terrain unbekannter Verheißungen führt. Eine Reihe von psychologisch aufgeladenen weiblichen Porträts spiegeln die Erfahrung eines „gespaltenen Selbst“. Axells Werk durchziehen auch Darstellungen homoerotischer Zwillingspaare – vertieft in eine Umarmung, einen Kuss oder in sexuell explizite Liebeszenen. Eine weitere Variante in Axells bevorzugten ‚Zwillingsbildern‘ sind Darstellungen multiethnischer weiblicher Akte, wie in Axells Filmexperiment Noire et Blanche (Schwarz und Weiß, 1966/7). Dieser Aspekt ihrer Motivik reflektierte die damalige postkoloniale Emanzipationswelle und die ‚Black Pride‘-Bewegung im amerikanischen Bürgerrechtsaktivismus, ein politischer Aufbruch, mit dem Axell sympathisierte.

Beim Anbruch der Ereignisse vom Mai 1968 stand Axell – neben Künstlerfreund Marcel Broodthaers – in der belgischen Kunstszene an vorderster Front der gegenkulturellen Proteste. Im Jahr 1970 schloss sie sich einer lokalen Kampagne an, die sich gegen die Verhaftung der US-amerikanischen Aktivistin und marxistischen Feministin Angela Davis richtete. Davis war eine der weiblichen Idole Axells, der sie zwei Porträts widmete.

Einen weiteren Auftritt hat die „Dopplung“ in Axells Werk in ihrer Vision des „Bio-Botanischen“ (Axell, 1970): exotische Tiere als Alter Egos, verzehrende tropische Vegetation und surreale Hybride machen diese alternative Sphäre einer „biokulturellen Gemeinschaft“ aus. In der verschlingenden Umarmung des Le Homard Amoureux (Verliebter Hummer, 1967) vereinigt sich die Form des weiblichen Akts mit dem Krebstier. Axell erforschte dieses von Dynamiken der Metamorphose beherrschte neue Universum eingehender in ihrer „Paradies“-Werkreihe aus den frühen 1970er Jahren. Die weibliche Figur wird hier in einen Zustand der kompletten Auflösung versetzt – „Nach und nach verlässt sie ihre Stimme. Dann ihre Erinnerung. Und zuletzt die Vernunft” (Axell, Gedicht, 1972). Sie vereint sich auf erotische Weise mit Pflanzen und Tieren und transformiert sich so zunehmend in eine „botanische“ Entität.

Die Motivik des Body Double schließt ihren Bogen in La Grande Sortie dans l’Espace (Die Große Reise ins Weltall, 1967), einem der Hauptwerke Axells: die futuristische Vision eines paganistisch anmutenden Tanzes von identischen Aktfiguren, die auf stilisierte Art Kosmonautinnen darstellen und durch einen abstrakten Raum schweben – eine Zone, in der sich weibliche Sinnlichkeit frei entfaltet, das Arkadien einer spielerischen, antiautoritären zukünftigen Dimension.

In seiner grenzüberschreitenden sexuellen Ikonographie, der feministischen Zielsetzung und den liberalistischen Utopievorstellungen ist Evelyne Axells Werk nach wie vor herausfordernd.

 

Imprint

ArtistEvelyne Axell
ExhibitionEvelyne Axell: Body Double
Place / venueMuzeum Susch, Susch, Switzerland
Dates1 August – 6 December 2020
Curated byAnke Kempkes and Krzysztof Kościuczuk
Websitewww.muzeumsusch.ch
Index

See also